oscar gutierrez jr
tballardbrown:

Michaela Deprince does not look like the “typical” 17-year-old ballet dancer. At 5’4″, she is shorter and more muscular than most ballet dancers. She is also from Sierra Leone and all three of these are noted “problems” (with the admitted race and body type issues in ballet) for someone who just wants to dance. But that isn’t stopping her at all.
(via How This Orphan From Sierra Leone Became A Famous Ballerina | Madame Noire)

tballardbrown:

Michaela Deprince does not look like the “typical” 17-year-old ballet dancer. At 5’4″, she is shorter and more muscular than most ballet dancers. She is also from Sierra Leone and all three of these are noted “problems” (with the admitted race and body type issues in ballet) for someone who just wants to dance. But that isn’t stopping her at all.

(via How This Orphan From Sierra Leone Became A Famous Ballerina | Madame Noire)


Lane and Pete.In celebration of Mad Men’s season finale this coming Sunday, Coloring for Grown-Ups will be posting a handful of Season 5 themed coloring book pages over the next couple of days.An excellent edition to any finale screening.THINGS YOU CAN DO RIGHT NOW:
-Download this page!
-Print it! Color it! Mail it back!
-Visit our website!
-Follow us on Facebook!
-Follow our brand new Twitter account
-Watch our Youtube videos!
-Order our coloring book

coloringforgrownups:

Mad Men coloring pages!

Lane and Pete.

In celebration of Mad Men’s season finale this coming Sunday, Coloring for Grown-Ups will be posting a handful of Season 5 themed coloring book pages over the next couple of days.

An excellent edition to any finale screening.



THINGS YOU CAN DO RIGHT NOW:

-Download this page!

-Print it! Color it! Mail it back!

-Visit our website!

-Follow us on Facebook!

-Follow our brand new Twitter account

-Watch our Youtube videos!

-Order our coloring book

coloringforgrownups:

Mad Men coloring pages!

poptech:


The Noun Project is a seemingly infinite collection of black-and-white symbols put into the public domain. As the founders put it, it is an attempt to organize the world’s visual language into one online database. Edward Boatman, one of the project’s founders, is also its sole gatekeeper. Each symbol on the database was either collected off the Internet or created by designers around the world. Boatman approves every submission to the project and assigns each icon a word — a noun, of course, either an object or a concept. The images are often surprisingly evocative, despite their simplicity, and unlock a potential for wordless communication for anyone with an Internet connection. 

— An Interview with Edward Boatman, Co-Founder of The Noun Project

poptech:

The Noun Project is a seemingly infinite collection of black-and-white symbols put into the public domain. As the founders put it, it is an attempt to organize the world’s visual language into one online database. Edward Boatman, one of the project’s founders, is also its sole gatekeeper. Each symbol on the database was either collected off the Internet or created by designers around the world. Boatman approves every submission to the project and assigns each icon a word — a noun, of course, either an object or a concept. The images are often surprisingly evocative, despite their simplicity, and unlock a potential for wordless communication for anyone with an Internet connection.

An Interview with Edward Boatman, Co-Founder of The Noun Project

npr:

ilovecharts:

-wibbly-wobblytimey-wimey
I make my living in the blue part of the pie; my semicolon game is on point like a sir.

I’m not even going to attempt to cleverly include a semicolon. —Sarah

npr:

ilovecharts:

-wibbly-wobblytimey-wimey

I make my living in the blue part of the pie; my semicolon game is on point like a sir.

I’m not even going to attempt to cleverly include a semicolon. —Sarah

timelightbox:

David Doubilet
Chinstrap and gentoo penguins on a small ice floe near Danko Island, Antarctic Peninsula.
The guest curators for this year’s LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph—beginning June 7 in Charlottesville, Va.—spoke to LightBox about how the festival came together. See more here.

timelightbox:

David Doubilet

Chinstrap and gentoo penguins on a small ice floe near Danko Island, Antarctic Peninsula.

The guest curators for this year’s LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph—beginning June 7 in Charlottesville, Va.—spoke to LightBox about how the festival came together. See more here.

Big cities have bustling corridors where saying “hello” would be out of place. But there are plenty of places, even within the most densely packed city, which lend themselves to neighborly acknowledgement: an apartment building, an office, a quieter residential street. After all, the feeling of connectedness is one of the benefits of living in a city. Let’s make sure to utilize it. It’s good for us.

Why You Should Say ‘Hello’ to Strangers on the Street (via theatlantic)

Hello everyone! *waves* — Tanya

(via npr)
poptech:


These vignettes draw comparisons between software and medicine — in their dual capacities to heal and to hurt. They explore the nature of addictive technologies in relation to business, the power that software designers are presently wielding over the masses, and a new way of imagining companies: as medicine men for the species. I hope these vignettes will help to inspire the engineering community to adopt a common set of ethical principles to guide the evolution of software (which, in turn, will help to guide the evolution of our species).

via Jonathan Harris (PopTech 2007) on his new project, Modern Medicine, a series of vignettes, which can be found on Farmer & Farmer

poptech:

These vignettes draw comparisons between software and medicine — in their dual capacities to heal and to hurt. They explore the nature of addictive technologies in relation to business, the power that software designers are presently wielding over the masses, and a new way of imagining companies: as medicine men for the species. I hope these vignettes will help to inspire the engineering community to adopt a common set of ethical principles to guide the evolution of software (which, in turn, will help to guide the evolution of our species).

via Jonathan Harris (PopTech 2007) on his new project, Modern Medicine, a series of vignettes, which can be found on Farmer & Farmer

npr:

nprfreshair:

hwentworth:

Internet’s over, people.  Maurice Sendak just won.

Fresh Air remembers Maurice Sendak

Higher praise there could not be. —Wright

npr:

nprfreshair:

hwentworth:

Internet’s over, people.  Maurice Sendak just won.

Fresh Air remembers Maurice Sendak

Higher praise there could not be. —Wright

pbstv:

“That manic kid in that silly wolf suit has made my life pleasurable.”
In 2002, the PBS NewsHour’s Jeffrey Brown talked to Maurice Sendak about his roots as an artist and his interest in exploring children’s perceptions of everyday life.
Read the interview and read Maurice Sendak’s full biography.

pbstv:

“That manic kid in that silly wolf suit has made my life pleasurable.”

In 2002, the PBS NewsHour’s Jeffrey Brown talked to Maurice Sendak about his roots as an artist and his interest in exploring children’s perceptions of everyday life.

Read the interview and read Maurice Sendak’s full biography.

I have nothing now but praise for my life. I’m not unhappy. I cry a lot because I miss people. They die and I can’t stop them. They leave me and I love them more. … What I dread is the isolation. … There are so many beautiful things in the world which I will have to leave when I die, but I’m ready, I’m ready, I’m ready.
Maurice Sendak on Fresh Air in 2011. [all interviews with Sendak here] (via nprfreshair)